What other results has the ACTIVE study shown?

Previous results from the ACTIVE study have been published in dozens of peer-reviewed, academic journals including the Journal of the American Medical Association and the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (among many others). Results have shown that all three types of cognitive training can improve cognitive function and protect against declines in instrumental activities of daily living—the skills…

Who were the scientists who organized the ACTIVE study?

ACTIVE was organized and funded by the National Institutes of Health (specifically, The National Institute on Aging and the National Institute for Nursing Research). Six principal investigators originally designed, executed, and analyzed the study: Dr. Karlene Ball (University of Alabama), Director of the UAB Edward R. Roybal Center for Research on Applied Gerontology Dr. George Rebok (Johns…

How much training did people in the ACTIVE study do?

Everyone assigned to a cognitive training program group was asked to do 10 hours of training. People trained in a group setting, twice per week for an hour at a time, over the course of five weeks. About half of the people in each cognitive training group were randomly assigned to do booster training, where…

What cognitive training programs were used in ACTIVE?

ACTIVE evaluated three different cognitive training programs: In memory training, participants were taught mnemonic strategies for remembering word lists and sequences of items, text material, and main ideas and details of stories. For example, participants were instructed how to organize word lists into meaningful categories and to form visual images and mental associations to recall words…

How was the study conducted?

These new results come from the Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly (ACTIVE) study, a large multi-site randomized controlled trial organized and funded by the National Institutes of Health. ACTIVE enrolled 2,832 community-dwelling and generally healthy participants, with an average age of 74. They were randomly assigned into one of three cognitive training…

What did the study show?

The group of people who used one specific cognitive training program, called “speed training” in the study, showed a statistically significant 33% reduction in the incidence of dementia. The effect was larger for people who did more of the training, with the group of people who did additional “booster” training showing a 48% reduction in…

What are the new scientific results?

Researchers have evaluated data from a ten-year study of cognitive training and shown that a specific type of brain training can reduce the risk of dementia. This is the first time that anything—brain-training program, physical exercise, diet/nutrition, or drug—has been shown to have this effect.

What happens to my paid subscription?

If you are a paid subscriber, first of all, thank you for being a subscriber! You will continue to have access to the same exercises and features (and new ones, as they come online). At the time of your next subscription renewal, you will automatically get a discount that maintains your current subscription rate. You…

How do I set up a new password for BrainHQ?

Select “Log in” at BrainHQ. Enter the email address you have been using (the same address as you use at aarp.org, which is the email associated with your performance data). Select “Forgot Password.” You will get an email with a link that allows you to set a new password for BrainHQ (which can either be…