Published Research on BrainHQ, Mood and Control

An upbeat mood and sense of control over one’s own life are key ingredients in self-confidence and quality of life. Dr. Fred Wolinsky of the University of Iowa has published four papers examining how using the BrainHQ exercise Double Decision (and others) affects mood and control. All four were based on large studies, with over 1,500 subjects. Two other papers have also been published showing positive benefits of using BrainHQ exercises for mood and control. Among other things, these papers reported:

  • those who trained for 10 hours with Double Decision felt greater control over their lives and more confidence in their everyday activities on average (in comparison to those in the control group)—and the differences persisted five years after training
  • those who began BrainHQ training without significant depressive symptoms had a 38% lower risk of developing them in the year following training (in comparison to a no-contact control group)
  • people who used the BrainHQ exercises were less likely to experience an increase in depressive symptoms

Information and citations for mood and control research

In general, these studies were conducted in cognitively healthy adults aged 65 and older, and in some cases, aged 50 and older. Where published studies make reference to clinical populations, it is for informational purposes only. BrainHQ is not intended to diagnose or treat any clinical condition.
  • “Immediate Mood Scaler: Tracking Symptoms of Depression and Anxiety Using a Novel Mobile Mood Scale”
    Published in: JMIR mHealth and uHealth
    Lead author: Mor Nahum, PhD, Hebrew University and Posit Science View article
  • “The effect of speed-of-processing training on depressive symptoms in ACTIVE”
    Published in: The Journals of Gerontology, Series A
    Lead Author: Fred Wolinsky, PhD, University of Iowa View abstract
  • “The ACTIVE cognitive training interventions and the onset of and recovery from suspected clinical depression”
    Published in: The Journals of Gerontology, Series B
    Lead Author: Fred Wolinsky, PhD, University of Iowa View article
  • “Does cognitive training improve internal locus of control among older adults?”
    Published in: The Journals of Gerontology, Series B
    Lead Author: Fred Wolinsky, PhD, University of Iowa View article
  • “The effect of cognitive speed of processing training on the development of additional IADL difficulties and the reduction of depressive symptoms: Results from the IHAMS randomized controlled trial”
    Published in: The Journal of Aging and Health
    Lead Author: Fred Wolinsky, PhD, University of Iowa View abstract
  • “Neuroplasticity-based computerized cognitive remediation for treatment-resistant geriatric depression”
    Published in: Nature Communications
    Lead Author: Sarah Shizuko Morimoto, PsyD, Weill Cornell Medical College View article
  • “Advanced cognitive training for breast cancer survivors: a randomized controlled trial”
    Published in: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment
    Lead author: Diane Von Ah, PhD, Indiana University School of Nursing View article