How to
What you do
Remember sequences of visual information
Skills targeted
  • Intelligence
How the exercise changes
  • The number of cards in the sequence to remember
  • Card details (suit, number, both)
  • Card presentation time
How you're scored
Your score is the percentage of comparisons you get right.

There are many different ways to be "intelligent." What all types of intelligence have in common, though, is the ability to call up, compare, and manipulate multiple pieces of information very quickly, all at the same time. We are confronted daily with problem solving and decision making situations. For example, in a supermarket you compare multiple varieties of a product and mentally calculate which one is the best value. On the way home you decide if there is enough gas to last the day or if you should go to the gas station directly.

In the Card Shark exercise, you will be presented with playing cards that are added one at a time to a sequence. Once presented, the card is turned over. Your task is to decide if the current card matches the card presented a specific number of steps back in the sequence.  For example, in the first level, you will decide if the current card matches the one presented just before it. In later levels, you will decide if the current card matches one presented further back in the sequence.

As you move through this intelligence exercise, it gets harder in these ways:

  1. The number of items to remember in the sequence increases
  2. The information to remember for each item changes (suit, number, both)
  3. The cards are presented for less time

Card Shark is an intelligence brain game designed to challenge your ability to retain, compare, and work with more visual information.