Published Research on BrainHQ and Mood

An upbeat mood and sense of control over one’s own life are key ingredients in self-confidence and quality of life. Four papers examining how using the BrainHQ exercise Double Decision affects mood have been published. Among other things, these papers reported:

  • those who trained for 10 hours with Double Decision felt greater control over their lives and more confidence in their everyday activities on average (in comparison to those in a control group)—and the differences persisted five years after training.1
  • those who began BrainHQ training without significant depressive symptoms had a 38% lower risk of developing them in the year following training (in comparison to a control group).2
  • people who used the BrainHQ exercises were less likely to experience an increase in depressive symptoms.3

Information and citations for mood-related articles

In general, these studies were conducted in cognitively healthy adults aged 65 and older, and in some cases, aged 50 and older. Remember that studies show average results, and that individual results will vary. Where published studies make reference to clinical populations, it is for informational purposes only. BrainHQ is not intended to diagnose or treat any clinical condition.
3 The effect of speed-of-processing training on depressive symptoms in ACTIVE
Wolinsky et al. (2009)
The Journals of Gerontology, Series A

Study population: People 65+

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2 The ACTIVE cognitive training interventions and the onset of and recovery from suspected clinical depression
Wolinsky et al. (2009)
The Journals of Gerontology, Series B

Study population: People 65+

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1 Does cognitive training improve internal locus of control among older adults?
Wolinsky et al. (2010)
The Journals of Gerontology, Series B

Study population: People 65+

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The effect of cognitive speed of processing training on the development of additional IADL difficulties and the reduction of depressive symptoms: Results from the IHAMS randomized controlled trial
Wolinsky et al. (2015)
The Journal of Aging and Health

Study population: People 50+

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