A Brain that Keeps on Teaching: H.M.’s Story

If you’ve ever dabbled in neuroscience (or work at a neuroscience-based company, like I do) you may have come across the story of “H.M.” H.M. was a man who had brain surgery in the 1950s to stop severe seizures. The surgeon ended up removing large pieces of H.M.’s brain. The result: far fewer seizures, and…

Your Brain in Love: Part 2 – Love and Marriage

Ed. note: This week, in the run-up to Valentine’s Day, we’re featuring a 5-part series about the neuroscience of love and romance. At the end, we’ll put the full series on our website. Enjoy! Unlike Helen Fisher, Ted Huston is more interested in studying what happens throughout long-term relationships. One interesting finding over a lifetime…

BrainHQ provides many real-world benefits

An article on Science Daily talked about a science publication by researchers from Florida State University who examined how technology is being used by senior citizens. The researchers refer to computer-based brain fitness programs and make the following statement: “There is limited but encouraging evidence that these so-called brain fitness software packages make a difference…

Brain Training and Its Critics

When I was in college, I took a lot of science courses. Really, a lot — maybe even too many. And mostly what they taught me was how scientists believed the world worked — right then, as of the early 1990’s. Luckily for me, my college roommate took a somewhat broader curriculum, and much to my benefit, we talked…

A Criticism Of Brain Training – And An Answer To It

An interesting paper came across my radar week – “Placebo effects in cognitive training” published in PNAS (with a paywall, unfortunately). In this paper, the authors investigate the effect that people’s expectations might have on the results of brain-training experiments. Every research study needs to recruit people to participate, and a common way is to…