Everyday Cognition

Published Research on BrainHQ and Everyday Cognition

A common criticism of brain training is that it only improves performance on the exercises in the training program—not on other skills that are useful in everyday life.

That is a fair criticism for many “brain games,” but not for BrainHQ.

Dozens of studies have measured how exercises in BrainHQ drive benefits that “generalize” to skills beyond what is directly trained; for example, the IMPACT Study showed that training auditory processing with BrainHQ also improved working memory.

What’s more, many studies have directly measured people’s abilities to perform normal everyday tasks before and after training with exercises in BrainHQ. Each one has shown that using BrainHQ is beneficial for everyday tasks.

  • Ten articles measured how well people could perform standard activities of daily living (such as managing money and keeping track of medications) and found that use of a BrainHQ exercise usage improved people’s ability to perform more efficiently and accurately.
  • Multiple studies asked people about their ability to perform daily activities before and after training, and found that people felt more capable after training. For instance, the IMPACT Study showed that 76% of people noticed positive changes in their daily activities (things like shopping efficiently and finding words more easily). The ten-year ACTIVE Study follow-up showed that even ten years after training, people who trained on a BrainHQ exercise (with a few booster sessions) experienced less decline in their ability to perform daily activities.
  • Many studies have also been published showing how BrainHQ training improves driving safety. (So many that they are included in a separate section. Please click here to find a description and listing of those studies.)

Information and citations for research on everyday cognition


“A cognitive training program based on principles of brain plasticity: Results from the Improvement in Memory with Plasticity-based Adaptive Cognitive Training (IMPACT) study”
Published in: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
Lead Author: Glenn E. Smith, PhD, Mayo Clinic
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“Improvement in memory with plasticity-based adaptive cognitive training: Results of the 3-month follow-up”
Published in: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
Lead Author: Elizabeth M. Zelinski, PhD, University of Southern California
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“Neurocognitive enhancement in older adults: Comparison of three cognitive training tasks to test a hypothesis of training transfer in brain connectivity”
Published in: NeuroImage
Lead Author: Maren Strenziok, PhD, George Mason University
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“Effects of cognitive training interventions with older adults: A randomized controlled trial”
Published in: Journal of the Association Medical Association
Lead Author: Karlene Ball, PhD, University of Alabama at Birmingham
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“Long-term effects of cognitive training on everyday functional outcomes in older adults”
Published in: Journal of the Association Medical Association
Lead Author: Sherry L. Willis, PhD, University of Washington
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“Ten-year effects of the ACTIVE cognitive training trial on cognition and everyday functioning in older adults”
Published in: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
Lead Author: George W. Rebok, PhD, Johns Hopkins University
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“Transfer of a speed of processing intervention to near and far cognitive functions”
Published in: Gerontology
Lead Author: Jerri D. Edwards, PhD, University of South Florida
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“The effect of cognitive speed of processing training on the development of additional IADL difficulties and the reduction of depressive symptoms: Results from the IHAMS randomized controlled trial”
Published in: Journal of Aging and Health
Lead Author: Fredric D. Wolinsky, PhD, University of Iowa
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“The impact of speed of processing training on cognitive and everyday performance”
Published in: Aging & Mental Health
Lead Author: Jerri D. Edwards, PhD, University of South Florida
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“Speed of processing training with middle-age and older adults with HIV: A pilot study”
Published in: Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care
Lead Author: David E. Vance, PhD, MGS, University of Alabama at Birmingham
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“Predictors of improvement following speed of processing training with middle-aged and older adults with HIV: A pilot study”
Published in: Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care
Lead Author: Jaspreet Kaur, University of Alabama at Birmingham
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“Computerized auditory cognitive training to improve cognition and functional outcomes in patients with heart failure: Results of a pilot study”
Published in: Heart & Lung
Lead Author: Ponrathi Athilingam, PhD, ACNP, MCH, FAANP, University of South Florida
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“Neuroplastic effects of combined computerized physical and cognitive training in elderly individuals at risk for dementia: an eloreta controlled study on resting states”
Published in: Neural Plasticity
Lead Author: Panagiotis Bamidis, PhD, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki
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“Comparing three methods of computerised cognitive training for older adults with subclinical cognitive decline”
Published in: Neuropsychological rehabilitation
Lead Author: Monica Rivera-Mindt, PhD, Fordham University , Bronx , NY
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“Feasibility of a home-based speed of processing training program in middle-aged and older adults with HIV”
Published in: J Neurosci Nurs
Lead Author: David E. Vance, PhD, MGS, University of Alabama at Birmingham
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“Effect of visual training on cognitive function in stroke patients”
Published in: International Journal of Nursing Sciences
Lead Author: Min Zhang, PhD, College of Nursing and Rehabilitation, North China University of Science and Technology, Tangshan, China
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“Computerized auditory cognitive training to improve cognition and functional outcomes in patients with heart failure: Results of a pilot study”
Published in: Heart & Lung: The Journal of Acute and Critical Care
Lead Author: Maya Guglin, MD, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY
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“A randomized study of cognitive remediation for forensic and mental health patients with schizophrenia”
Published in: Journal of Psychiatric Research
Lead Author: Peter F. Buckley, MD, Georgia Regents University
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